Anemia Helena MT

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John Philip Johnson
(406) 444-7530
2755 Colonial Dr
Helena, MT
Specialty
Clinical Genetics (M.D.)

Data Provided By:
Lee Richard Travis
(406) 447-2641
2475 Broadway
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Jeannie John Brandt
(406) 444-7500
2755 Colonial Dr
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Richard Paul Sargent
(406) 447-2841
820 N. Montana Avenue
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Jean Justad
(406) 442-2205
301 Saddle Dr
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Tracy Brian Dill
(406) 447-2641
2475 Broadway
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Jennifer Lee Brunsdon
(406) 447-2841
820 N. Montana Avenue
Helena, MT
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Elaine Susan Samuel
(406) 457-4300
2525 Broadway Suite 201
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Stephen John Mest
(406) 447-2641
2475 Broadway
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
David W Jordan
(406) 443-3457
1 Medical Park Dr
Helena, MT
Specialty
Internal Medicine

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What is Anemia?

Answer:
Anemia is a condition that results from the lack of healthy red blood cells in the body’s bloodstream. It

can also be caused by a deficiency in hemoglobin , a protein which allows the blood cells to carry oxygen, in the body’s red blood cells.

Anemia may be caused by three major sources: excessive blood loss, decreased red blood cell production, and the destruction of red blood cells. Blood loss may result in a sharply decreased number of red blood cells, and may go unnoticed if it occurs slowly and chronically, typically as a result of ulcers, hemorrhoids, menstruation, or childbirth. Decreased production of red blood cells is typically a result of a genetic condition, such as sickle-cell anemia, or an iron or vitamin deficiency. The destruction of blood cells may also be the result of a hereditary disorder, or it could result from an infection, a toxin, or a drug.

Because of the decreased capacity of the blood to carry oxygen, either by a lower number of cells which can or a decreased ability of the cells to do so, anemia causes a lack of oxygen in the body’s organs. This results in symptoms of weakness, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Anemia is typically diagnosed with the use of blood counts, which report the density of red blood cells in the patient’s blood as well as the body’s hemoglobin levels.

The treatment of anemia is dependent upon the cause. Anemia caused by blood loss may be treated by stemming the ...

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